History

The roots of the Amish and Mennonites originated from the Anabaptist movement,
which began in Zurich, Switzerland in 1525.

The Amish get their name from Jacob Ammaan who split off from the Mennonites
in 1693.

The Amish began arriving in Pennsylvania in the late 1600’s, fleeing religious
persecution in Europe.
The Amish and Mennonite both settled in Pennsylvania as part of William Penn’s
“Holy experiment” of Religious tolerance.
The first sizable group of Amish arrived in Lancaster County in the early 1700’s.

Route 340, that passes beside Abe’s Buggy Rides was built in 1733 by King George II
and was called the King’s Highway in Colonial days.The town of Bird-in-Hand
was established in 1734, receiving its name from a sign on a local Inn.

The Amish are a hard working people dedicated to leading a good family life,
staying humble, helping in their community, and following the Ordnung
which is an unwritten set of rules they follow.

The Old Order Amish do not drive cars, but rather drive a horse and buggy,
and do not have electricity in their homes. Their children attend a one-room
school house where they are taught 1-8 grade. They mostly speak a dialect of
German called Pennsylvania Dutch at home and with friends.
When in church they worship in high German. And they learn English
when attending school.

The Old Order Amish believe their woman and girls should dress modestly
in solid colors. They do not cut their hair or wear jewelry.
And they are not allowed to go in public without having their heads covered
by their prayer covering.
Men and boys also wear the dark clothing and always a black or straw hat.
They do not have mustaches but must grow a beard when they get married.
They dress this way as an expression of their beliefs and in order to stay humble.

They are a people who have chosen this way of life because of their faith.
To them this is a way of everyday living and not a show.
Most do not like their pictures taken, but a few will allow it if asked.
We ask that you be polite and courteous toward them and respect their privacy.